Category: PASS

Aug 20 2014

The Red Gate Way…

SitCAs companies go, Red Gate is a little different. That is readily apparent in our tools and the philosophy behind them, ingeniously simple. But, we do a lot of other things too. There’s the Simple-Talk web site where we publish serious articles on all aspects of development and database administration across platforms and programming languages. There’s SQL Server Central, the single largest SQL Server community on the planet. There’s Ask SQL Server where you can get direct answers to your direct questions about SQL Server. If all that’s not enough, there are all the books, which we give away for free, on, again, all aspects of programming and database administration. But, we like to do more, so we also bring you training, the Red Gate way, at the SQL in the City events.

We’ve got two more SQL in the City events coming up soon. First, we’re back in London again on Friday, October 24, 2014. This event is one of my favorites, every year. We’re bringing in MVPs like Steve Jones, Ike Ellis, Brian Randell and others, all to teach you about SQL Server, but we’re doing it the Red Gate way. So please, register for this event. I’ll see you there and we can share a frothy beverage (it’s Red Gate).

Next, I’m thrilled to say that we’re going to be in Seattle on Monday, November 3, 2014. That’s right, just before the PASS Summit. If you wanted a reason to get out to Seattle early, here it is. We’re bringing a lot of the same crew from the London event over to Seattle. You’ll be able to experience what the London people did and more. This is SQL Server training done right, that is the Red Gate Way. Let’s get together and talk and share a frothy beverage in the States. It’s a free event, but there’s limited room, so please register now.

These are unique and popular events. We pull out all the stops to make them fun, special, educational, useful, helpful, doggone it, good. Please, come out, talk to me, talk to the Red Gate team, help influence the tools that you use every day, and learn about SQL Server.

Jul 23 2014

Challenge Accepted

There seemed to be some question whether my comfort level with my own masculinity would prevent me from wearing these:

Fluffy

Oh please! Couldn’t we be a little more challenging? Anyway, here’s the deal, you donate to a good cause, Doctors Without Borders. We hit 10K and I’ll sport those lovely rainbow whatever-they-are at the PASS Summit 2014. Sound good?

I’ll go one better. You double the goal, make it hit 20K, and I’ll present my session while wearing the rainbow whosimawatchits. BOOM!

BRING-IT

Jul 21 2014

Victims of Success

I took part in the PASS Summit 2014 selection committee this year because I was really curious about seeing how the sausage gets made. I’ve seen how actual sausage gets made and I still eat sausage.  Despite a few hiccups and communication issues, internal and external, I think the selection process for the Summit went really well this year. But, there was still some controversy. Being a naturally pushy person, I got involved in the controversy, for good or ill, and subsequently have had conversations with many people about the selection process (which, reiterating, I think went extremely well overall). But, the one thing that kept coming up over and over was a simple question:

How come I/PersonX didn’t get picked?

The easy answer is because you/PersonX had a horrible abstract. But you know what, in probably most cases, that’s not true. Good abstracts by good people didn’t get selected, so what the heck? I think the more complex answer does not go back to the selection committee or the selection criteria or the selection process. Do I think some improvements are possible there? Yes, and I’m putting my foot where my mouth is (or something) and joining the committees to try to make some tweaks to the system to make it better (and really, we need tweaks, I want to repeat, risking ad naseum, the process went well and worked great and I’m happy I took part and I think the outcome is pretty darned good). No, the real problem lies elsewhere, SQL Saturdays.

I’m not saying SQL Saturdays are themselves a problem. What I’m saying is that PASS took on the whole SQL Saturday concept for several reasons, one of which was for it to act as a farm team for speakers. This will be my 10th Summit. Looking back to 10 years ago, while I really loved the event, oh good god have the speakers improved. I remember sitting in sessions with people who were mumbling through their presentations so much that, even with a microphone, you couldn’t hear half of what they said. Slide decks that consisted of 8-12 pages of text (yes, worse than Paul Randal’s slides, kidding, don’t hit me Paul). Speakers who really, clearly, didn’t have a clue what they were talking about. It was kind of rocky back then. I learned my second year that you had to talk to people to find out, not just which sessions sounded good, but which speakers were going to present those sessions well enough that it would be worthwhile. Why were there so many weak presenters? Well, because there was almost nothing between speaking at local user groups and speaking at Summit (I made the leap that way). There were a few code camps around, a couple of other major events, various schools and technical courses, and Summit. I don’t know how the old abstract/speaker review process worked (and I apologize to whoever read my first abstract because I know now just how horrific it was and I’m so sorry I wasted your time), but I’m pretty sure they were desperate to get enough submissions that sounded coherent with a speaker attached that probably could get the job done. Not any more.

Now, people are getting lots of opportunities to present at SQL Saturday events all over the world. And it’s working. We’re growing speakers. We’re growing good speakers. Don’t believe me? Then you go to two or three events in a month, sit through 8-12 sessions, mostly by newer people, not Brent Ozar, not Denny Cherry, not Kim Tripp, and you review them, each, individually, then go back and try to pick the best one. Oh yeah, there’s going to be a few dogs in the bunch, but overall, you’re going to find a great bunch of presentations by a great bunch of speakers. Our farm system is working and working well. But there’s a catch.

Because we have upped the bar pretty radically on all the introductory level speakers (and if you’re thinking about presenting, don’t let that slow you down, everyone starts at zero and goes up), that means the competition at the top (and yes, I do consider the Summit the top in many ways, not all, see SQLBits) is becoming and more and more fierce. That means, my abstracts probably need quite a bit more polish than they’re getting (and so do yours) because there are a whole slew of speakers coming up that are writing killer abstracts. That means I need to really be concerned about the evaluations (despite the fact that I get dinged because the stage is low, the room is hot/cold, lunch didn’t have good vegetarian choices, England left the Cup early, all outside my control) because there are new speakers that are knocking it out of the park. In short, you/I/PersonX didn’t get picked because the competition has heated up in a major way.

In short, a sub-section of the community, defined by those who wish to speak, are victims of the success of the farm team system as represented by SQL Saturday. On the one hand, that sucks because I now need to work harder than ever on my abstracts, on the other, we’re going to see very few instances of really bad presentations at Summit. We’ve improved the brand and the community. It’s a good thing.

Jul 15 2014

Execution Plan Details

I wouldn’t say it’s common knowledge that you should look at execution plans when tuning queries, but it’s not exactly uncommon knowledge either. But, people tend to get focused on just looking at the graphical part of the plan and there’s just not enough information there. Let’s take a look at a query:

SELECT  pc.Name,
        ps.Name,
        v.Name,
        pr.ReviewerName,
        p.Name,
        v.ModifiedDate,
        p.Color
FROM    Production.Product AS p
        LEFT JOIN Production.ProductReview AS pr
        ON pr.ProductID = p.ProductID
        JOIN Production.ProductSubcategory AS ps
        ON p.ProductSubcategoryID = ps.ProductSubcategoryID
        JOIN Production.ProductCategory AS pc
        ON pc.ProductCategoryID = ps.ProductCategoryID
        JOIN Purchasing.ProductVendor AS pv
        JOIN Purchasing.Vendor AS v
        ON v.BusinessEntityID = pv.BusinessEntityID
        ON pv.ProductID = p.ProductID
WHERE   v.ModifiedDate = '2006-02-17 00:00:00.000'
AND p.Color LIKE 'Y%';

This generates an execution plan that looks like this:

PlanDetails

Neither v.ModifiedDate nor p.Color have indexes. Yet, we only see a single scan in this plan, on the BusinessEntity.Vendor table. Why? Well, we can’t tell from the GUI directly, so, you have to look to the tool tips or the properties. The tool tip in this case actually proves helpful, as does the properties:

PlanDetailsProperties

In short, the clustered index is used to seek out a number of rows and then a secondary predicate is placed on those few rows to further filter the results. You would never even guess at that using just the GUI alone. You have to look to the details of the execution plan to understand that. There are lots of other examples where you can only get the information from the properties because not everything is available in the tooltip. This can include things like Optimization Level, Reason For Early Termination, Scan Direction, and a bunch of other things. Just remember to drill down to the properties in order to better understand your execution plans.

Why do you need information like this? Are we going to tune this query? Maybe we could help it by adding an index t the Vendor table. But, at least for this query with this date range, it appears we don’t need an index on the Product table. But, that may change depending on the number of rows returned from the Vendor table. A different data set can result in an entirely different execution plan with entirely different performance characteristics.

Query tuning is tough. That’s why I’ve put together a one-day seminar to get you started on it. There’s still room in Albany, on July 25th. You can register here. I’ll also be teaching at SQL Connections in September in Las Vegas. Go here to register for this great event. In Belgium in October, I’ll be doing an all day session on just execution plans at SQL Server Days. Go here to register for this event. When I did a similar session at the PASS Summit two years ago, it sold out. I’ll be presenting at Summit this year in Seattle in November. Go here to register. But do it early or you may be put on a waiting list.

 

 

 

 

Jul 03 2014

Reflections on the 2014 PASS Summit Selection Process

Oh we are a bunch of high school kids at heart. Maybe high school never ends (and there’s a nightmare, god I hated high school). But, there’s been drama about the 2014 PASS Summit sessions and the Selection Committee’s work. I was on the committee. I worked as a part of the team responsible for rating sessions for the Azure track (said track is gone, more on that later). As self-serving a statement as this is, I think we did a good job. Further, I think the process worked. You can read the official explanation of the process here. Amy did great work and deserves your thanks. All the volunteers who reviewed over 900 submissions from more than 300 people, ON THEIR OWN TIME, FOR FREE, also deserve your thanks. The vitriol directed at the PASS organization over the outcome of this selection process is not directed only at the Board. It’s also directed at the volunteers. And, as a volunteer, that sucks.

The team I worked on rated, I forget, 50 sessions I think. We had to read through them and give them a score based on several criteria. We also had to write comments on each and every session. I was dinged by HQ for not writing a comment on a session that I gave 5′s to on the ratings (so I commented something like “Can’t wait to see this at Summit”). We were only given 10 slots to fill, so that means 40 sessions got kicked to the curb. That’s a lot of people who didn’t get selected. And not getting selected sucks (yes, I do know, I’ve been rejected by a number of events this year, big ones, even ones I’ve spoken at previously, not whining, just pointing out that I don’t have a secret method for getting accepted). Our track actually got eliminated and the sessions that we selected were distributed to other tracks. Also, a couple of sessions we rated highly didn’t do so well when the speaker scores were applied, so there was some shift there (one thing PASS could improve, give us some indication of the secret sauce there, we know there is one, but a little understanding of how it’s applied would help). But over all, the sessions we rated highly, got selected. Congratulations and well done to those speakers. Just look at the people presenting, many for the first time. That’s going to be an absolutely awesome event. And once more, thank the volunteers for doing all that work.

So, some of you are now thinking that, “Oh, Grant’s on the side of PASS” (well, actually, yes, I am, so should you be) “Grant has been told to be nice and play good and not be critical” (even though I’ve already made a criticism about the magic numbers and I was tweeting almost literally threatening messages this week) “Grant got selected so he’s being a <insert bad name here> about the whole thing” (I may or may not be a <insert bad name here> but I don’t agree that I’m being one about this) or, maybe you’re on the other side “OMG! He’s criticizing PASS in any regard, The HUMANITY! Have you at long last sir no decency” (no, not really).

Remember those comments, that I had to write for every abstract, including the great ones? I put a small critical review of the abstract in every one (OK, not the one that I gave 5s to). I said what was wrong with the abstract in my subjective opinion. And let’s be perfectly clear about that (channeling President Obama), they’re my opinions. If I thought you didn’t define the problem space your presentation was meant to address, I said that. You disagree? OK. If I thought your very clever and witty title seriously detracted from the clarity of what the session was about, and it wasn’t that witty, I said that too. You’re the wittiest person you know and everyone says so? OK. My opinion may not jive with yours. But, it’s the one thing I’ve seen everyone who has ever been rejected by the committee ask for, “Tell me what I can do to improve.” OK. I did. At least in my opinion. On every single abstract (except that one).

PASS didn’t release them.

And then, PASS did.

The volunteers (unpaid, remember) did the work, and now it gets to see the light of day.

This brings up a number of points. First, when I got rejected by those other events, did I get a reason for my rejection? Nope. Other events just reject you, thanks for playing. I think PASS, which is all about community, should be different. We should tell people why, not just that there were higher rated sessions, but what they can do to improve. I’ve talked to people in the know, not all the comments provide that kind of information. I think we’ll get better next time. Second, peoples feelings are going to be hurt by these comments. Yes. Yes they are. Suck it up buttercup. You want to know what you can do to improve so you can get selected, but your abstract is absolute perfection (in your opinion), so how dare someone else suggest that it’s not worthy of inclusion, blah, blah, blah, We’re going to see lots of blog posts where people disagree with these comments and that could reflect back in some negative way on the organization. I suppose so, but if we’re going to be about community and we’re going to try to raise up new speakers, we’re going to have to be able to deal with some degree of friction. That may even come from experienced people irked that they didn’t get picked. Everyone has a bad day. Again, I think we can weather this. Finally, the different teams and individuals on the teams probably gave substantially different levels of comments with varying degrees of quality. Some of the comments are just going to be useless. Further, My opinion probably doesn’t jive with my teammates in every regard. Maybe a team didn’t put critical comments in at all (although they had to put in comments). Yes, these things are going to be uneven, maybe even contradictory. OK. Again, cope.

This blog post once started off as a rebuke of the selection process around those comments. It’s not now. I want to repeat, one more time, I think the committee did great work and selected an awesome set of presentations that will make for a wonderful Summit. Thank you for all your hard work. And thank you, Amy, for doing a great job organizing what is a daunting task. And thanks for releasing the comments.

Jun 26 2014

Passion

I know I tend to be overly passionate. It’s something that has gotten me into trouble in the past. It’s also probably a huge factor in the things I’ve been able to accomplish in life. I’m bringing it up at this time because I think passion is causing some conflict within the community around the Professional Association for SQL Server (PASS).

On the 25th of June just past the announcements went out for the sessions accepted at the PASS Summit 2014. I found this stressful and exciting two ways. First, and for me personally, most importantly, because I had submitted several sessions and I desperately wanted to speak at the PASS Summit (I’ve spoken there every year since 2008 and I’ve made the Top 10 sessions two years in a row, for which I’m truly grateful, back to our story). Second, because this year I wanted to help make a difference so I volunteered on the selection committee (and I was on a committee other than one I submitted for, I didn’t influence selection there at all). I wanted to get my sessions accepted, and I wanted to see the work I put in on display. Happily, both occurred. But, the day was marred.

Let’s sidetrack (again) for a moment. I consider myself to be just a guy, a DBA, a developer, an IT pro. It’s what I’ve been doing for 20+ years (yeah, I’m old) and I’ve been relatively successful at it. But, I’m also a Microsoft MVP, a published author, frequent blogger, and an international speaker. I attribute most of that stuff, not to any great ability I have, but to a lot of luck, a lot of hard work, and, here’s the kicker, to my involvement with PASS. Go back ten years, I went to my first Summit down in Dallas, TX. I attended sessions and went back to my hotel room, except one night. During that day I had spent a little time chatting with a company and they invited me to a party they were throwing that night. I went. And I met some people. They were just DBAs and developers, just like me, but, they were also involved in the organization that put on the event, PASS. I liked these people. So, I started volunteering which led to another Summit and another and writing and speaking and… well, let’s just say, getting involved was a good thing. Being passionate about it all paid off, literally and figuratively. I really do owe PASS and the people that make it up a lot.

So, there are a lot of passionate people in this little gang of ours. And some of those passionate people didn’t like the outcome of the selection process. Being passionate, they voiced their opinions. LOUDLY. At length. Some of what they said had merit. Some of what they said was just hurt feelings. Some of what they said was a complete misunderstanding of how things worked within the committees and the selection process. But a lot of passionate people, who care about PASS, argued for a little while about the Summit selections. And, being a passionate guy, I took part. A lot of the work I did for the committee wasn’t making the light of day (more on that later, maybe, depending on how some internal communications turn out) and I was quite passionate about that. I don’t know this for a fact, but I suspect pretty strongly that my passion, what’s more, my public passion, around this topic made some people angry. I’m positive that others passion for the topic, regardless of their causes and the rightness or wrongness of their cause, definitely made people angry. Here’s where I get in trouble.

Get over it.

If we didn’t care about PASS and what the organization has done for us, and how we’d like to help it, and help others, and grow it, and reward ourselves (because I do believe everyone is fundamentally greedy, might as well acknowledge it), and just plain replicate the experience for others that I’ve had (because it’s been an overwhelmingly positive experience, I can’t say enough good things about PASS), then there wouldn’t be any passion. And if there was no passion, there would be no brouhaha and hurt feelings and the developing cliques (oh yeah, people are drawing lines like this was a war in the Balkans, apropos on the 100th Anniversary of World War I). But you know what, if there wasn’t any passion for, in, and around this organization, then it wouldn’t be the organization that it is.

It’s a great organization and people are going to be passionate about it. Cope. Passion is going to lead people to saying negative as well as positive things. Deal. People just might say negative things about you. Develop an epidermis.

Look, we should be able to disagree without being disagreeable, but passion leads us down dark roads sometimes. Let’s try to be understanding of that fact and recognize that the passion that makes this organization great is also the one that’s going to lead to conflict sometimes. Let’s just try to remember that and maybe we’ll be able to work towards sharing the great things this organization does with others and fight with each other less. Maybe.

NOTE: I made an edit about the work I did on the selection committee. It was on a track that I didn’t submit for. There was no way my work there could influence my selection. Plus the fact that the abstract evals and speaker evals were done by two different teams of people. Just want to be clear about that.

Apr 10 2014

I’m a Traveling Man

We are coming into quite a busy time for my speaking schedule. I’m hitting the road. It does one thing for me that I truly love, I get to talk to people. So, if you have questions, want to chat, need to call me a pompous know-it-all to my face, I’ve got some opportunities for you.

Next week, April 13-16, is SQL Intersection. You can register by clicking here. The following week, I’ve got two events. First, on Friday April 25th, Red Gate Software is hosting a free half day SQL in the City Seminar in the Chicago area. We’ll be talking database deployment all day. Go here to register, but don’t wait, seats absolutely are limited. And, since this is a Red Gate event, at the end of the day, I’ll buy you a beverage or two while we exchange war stories. The next day, Saturday April 26th, is SQL Saturday Chicago I’ll be presenting a session. Check out the lineup and get yourself registered. That’s it for April.

May gets really fun. Saturday May 3 is SQL Saturday Atlanta. This is one of those “I was there” events for the Atlanta area. I’ll be there. Saturday May 17 is SQL Saturday Detroit. This one, at the moment, looks pretty intimate, but that means you get to hang out with Jeff Moden, Ginger Ford, Allen White, Tim Ford and ask questions until you run out of questions. I wouldn’t miss it if I lived in that area. Heck, I don’t live in that area and I’ll be there too. Then I get to go on my Carolina Cruise. I’m visiting three user groups in three days in the Carolinas. First up is Raleigh at the Triangle SQL Server User Group on the 20th. Then I get to Charlotte (and that was a great city for hosting the PASS Summit) on the 21st. Finally I’m off to Columbia and the Midland PASS Chapter on the 22nd. That’s going to be a blast. And we’re not done with May. On the 27th and 28th I’m going to hop the pond to speak at TechoRama in Belgium. I’m terribly excited about this event. Maybe it’s just because I like Belgian beer, but it really does look pretty cool. Go here to get registered. And I love the count-down clock on the web page. That’s exactly how I feel.

In June I come back over to my side of the pond. There are some events we’re still setting up. But the ones I know I’m going to are SQL Saturday Louisville on the 21st of May. But, the day before, on the 20th, I have an all day seminar on query tuning. Click here to register. We should have another SQL in the City Seminar set up for June as well as a couple of more SQL Saturday events. I’ll post once I learn more.

July is still pretty open (please, please, please, OH, PLEASE, I want to got to SQL Bits), but I do have another all day seminar on query tuning set up for Albany. You can go here to register. That’s the day before SQL Saturday Albany. It’s going to be their first event, so let’s help make it a great one.

As the schedule for June and July solidifies I’ll publish another listing. Let’s get together and talk.

Mar 21 2014

PASS DBA Virtual Chapter Talk

I almost forgot to tell you about the Database Administration Virtual Chapter meeting next week, March 26th, 2014. I’ll be doing a talk about query tuning in Windows Azure SQL Database. It’s a talk I’ve given before (it was in the top 10 at the PASS Summit last year). Come find out why you’ll need to tune queries in WASD, the tools you get, and the glorious fact that you’ll actually be actively saving your business money by tuning queries! Click here now to register.

Mar 17 2014

SQL Saturday: You can’t have it all.

SQL Saturday’s are awesome! Let’s get that clear up front. The organizers of SQL Saturday events are glorious individuals. Let’s get that clear too.

I want to be up front about those things because, well, I’m going to be critical.

First though, I want to establish my bona fides for what I’m about to say. I helped organize two SQL Saturday events and two other local events before those. I also help Red Gate Software run half-day seminars all over the country. So, I have some idea what goes into the organizational side of these things. I’ve presented at eleven SQL Saturday events in just the last year. I’m on the schedule for, I think, 6 more between now and August. So, I think I have some idea what it’s like to be a speaker at the events. And, I work for a vendor who puts money and swag up at the events in order to get some advertising. Which gives me some ideas behind what makes the vendors happy too. Further, I’m one of the community. I attend the sessions, talk to the sponsors, take part in the after events, the whole magilla. I don’t think any of this makes me an expert or makes my voice more important than anyone else, but it all comes together to show that I’m not utterly clueless in my opinions (which, I know the adage, opinions are like certain body parts, everyone has one, and they all stink).

Organizers, I’ve seen this issue a lot and it’s just getting worse. This issue is going to hurt you with, in no particular order; speakers, sponsors and the community. What are you doing? You’re trying to have it all.

You want sponsors, right? The sponsors frequently ask for one thing… please, please, please, let us do a presentation so we can show off how wicked awesome our products are to the most motivated people in the region (yeah, the people who are giving up a Saturday to learn technology for their jobs are the best people in the area where that SQL Saturday is taking place). So, you agree to letting the sponsors have a talk… ooh, but when to schedule it?

You want BIG NAME speakers, right? Although I’m absolutely convinced that big name speakers don’t really draw people to your event. Good sessions, usually defined by good session titles, draw people to your event (and good communication on your part through various venues and… well, that’s a different discussion I’ll leave for Karla). But, the belief is there, so people try to get Brent Kline and Kendal Ford and Jes Misner to come speak at their event. BUT, you also want to meet the needs of the local community so you can grow new speakers, so you’re going to take in a bunch of new people too… ah, but how do you schedule that?

And you’re committed to your community too, right? And one of the best ways to show your commitment to your community is to host a panel at lunch. The most common panel is Women in Technology, but I’ve also seen or heard about panels on educating young people, charities, user groups, and all sorts of things. Great stuff really and a big part of why the SQL Family is so wonderful. We really do try to help each other out. We really do care, and those panels give people a chance to communicate what they’ve done to others who may want to contribute in the same way. Ah… but when can we schedule this panel?

By now, I’ll bet many of you know what I’m about to say. But, before I say it, let me point out one more thing. SQL Saturday’s are all day affairs. And if anyone goes to the entire thing, they’re in the building from 8AM to 4PM (or so), so, we’re going to feed them something at mid-day. That really bites into our schedule too.

When can we put all this together? A WIT panel, sponsor talks, new speakers, experienced speakers and lunch…. Hey, hold on. Let’s put it all at lunch. That’s just a gaping hole in the schedule begging to be filled.

And there lies the problem. Putting all this together, all at the same time, hurts something. And, putting it all at lunch, pretty much hurts all of it. It’s hard to get your food and then find your way to a room to eat it in, or, conversely attend the session you want and get your food later, or, try to eat and then go into a session half way through. You can’t do it all. And then, when you think about the audience mix you just created, you’re hurting new speakers because people may skip their session to attend the sponsor session or the WIT panel. The WIT panel is going to suffer because you scheduled an experienced, known, speaker at lunch because you just ran out of room to put them anywhere else. And the sponsors… I’ll be blunt. We want eyeballs. And you just gave them alternatives, and we know they already have alternatives with our competitors doing a session at the same time, but did you have to clean out everyone for the WIT panel too?

In short, organizers, you need to start to pare it down. Don’t try to do it all. You want to support sponsors at lunch? Cool, do that. Schedule the WIT panel to 1/2 hour before the prize drawing (I’ve seen that done, it worked well). You want to have sessions at lunch? Fine. Don’t schedule the sponsors for then. Extend the day and have sponsor sessions before or after lunch. Want to get eyeballs to the local speaker or the big name speaker? Cool, but leave the sponsors out of it. Can’t work out how to fit ALL this in? Then don’t. Don’t even try. Give up on some of it. Pick and choose to make your event yours. But don’t try to cram so much stuff in that you basically make it difficult for the speakers and the community and the sponsors and the attendees.

Feb 06 2014

Thank You!

I am humbled and honored (and more than a little horrified) to be on this list of the Best of PASS Summit 2013. I mean look at those names. Every single one is a person I look up to and respect and learn from constantly. How I made a list like this… well, thanks. I appreciate the support and kindness that was shown at the PASS Summit when you filled out your evals.

Oh, and while I realize intellectually and SQL skill-wise he totally kicks my behind… Neener, neener Conor. You’re in the DBA track and I’m the only one in the top 10 in the Cloud track.

By the gods, I’m going to pay for that, but it’ll be worth it.