Extended Events in AWS RDS

AWS, RDS
For the longest time, we didn't have one of the most useful tools for monitoring SQL Server behavior, but I just found out that, indeed, you can use Extended Events in AWS RDS. I'm not waiting around. Let's see it in action. Setup For Extended Events in AWS RDS AWS has posted the documentation on what you have to do in order to enable the collection of Extended Events within RDS. Normallly, I'd follow along with the documentation. However, I'm going to approach this like I knew that Extended Events support was there, but I wasn't aware of the docs. So, I'm starting in SSMS and I'm just going to try plugging in the Extended Events GUI to see what happens. Further, I'm going to use the simplest method for…
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Query Tuning and Easy Solutions

SQL Server
TLDR: There ain't one. I was privileged last week to be able to present a couple of sessions at the SQL Server and Azure SQL Conference (great event, I recommend it). One of my sessions was an intro to query tuning. Basically, I went through a bunch of common code smells and suggested different possible solutions. The one thing that came up, both from my own stories and the questions from the (engaged) audience, is just how much everyone wants a magic, run fast, switch. Query Tuning The Easy Way Here you go. The single easiest way to make your queries run faster: Just throw money at the problem. Buy more hardware. Buy bigger hardware. Get more disks and disk controllers (not just more disks). Go to the next highest…
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Two Years of “Good Morning!”

Professional Development
Two years ago at the start of the pandemic, I wasn't feeling great about things. I saw that quite a few others weren't all that thrilled about how things were going either. So, to help my own mood, and to try to be a service to others, I started tweeting a little "Good Morning!" post every work day. I filled them with happy thoughts, tips I'd read on handling depression, suggestions I learned on health, anything that would help people, just a teeny amount, at the start of the day. Now, I'm not some licensed therapist or anything like that. I just wanted to do something to help others where I know I needed help. That's it. Two years later and I've written a bunch of tweets. Based on feedback…
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Execution Plan Properties

Uncategorized
I've watched several people recently go straight to XML when reading execution plans because they didn't know about the execution plan properties in the first operator. Now, don't get me wrong. If going straight to the XML is working for you, that's fine. Keep doing it. I'm absolutely not questioning how anyone does things. I just want people to know that "hidden" information isn't so much hidden as much as it's not too obvious. First Operator I've written before about the first operator in an execution plan (here, as well as here, and here, and even a problem with them here). I don't have a whole lot to add to those posts. If you look around at other blog posts I've done on execution plans, I use the properties of…
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Query Plans in Azure Data Studio

SQL Server
I have long been a fan of Azure Data Studio, but one shortcoming has kept me from truly adopting it: Query Plans in Azure Data Studio. Sure, there was a plug-in you could install. Also, you could use a somewhat truncated version of Plan Explorer, but all I wanted was for SQL Server Management Studio plans to be query plans in Azure Data Studio. Go and get version 1.35 of the tool. Right now. DUDE! You have 1.35 of Azure Data Studio? Cool. Now, go to the menu bar. Click on "File." Click on "Preferences". Click on "Settings". Now, type the following into the search box: workbench editor enable preview. You should see this: Check the box below where it says "Workbench > Editor: Enable Preview" just like I have…
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Database Fundamentals #31: Unique Constraints from the GUI

Database Fundamentals, SQL Server
In the last few Fundamentals posts you were introduced to a couple of ways to limit and control the data stored in the tables in your database. A primary key won’t allow a duplicate value. A foreign key won’t allow a value to be added that doesn’t already exist in the parent table and it will prevent data from being deleted. These are types of constraints on data in your database. There are a bunch of other ways to constrain the data in an effort to ensure that the data stored is exactly what the business needs. The next few Fundamentals posts will cover several methods of limiting data. Unique Constraints to Stop Duplicates When the concept of the primary key was introduced earlier in the series, two different types…
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Azure Data Studio Intellisense

SQL Server
I recently saw a question about the Azure Data Studio Intellisense: "Why won't intellisense in Azure Data Studio work with different schemas?" Immediately I thought, "Wait, it does." But, testing is your buddy. Azure Data Studio Intellisense Azure Data Studio Intellisense is on by default. Also, I like it a little better than the one in SSMS because it will start trying to help you, as you type (like a 3rd party software I can't live without). However, they're partly right. Let's say I want 'Person.Address' so I start typing like this: It doesn't know that I have a table named 'Person.Address'. It's trying to be helpful. You can even see how it's doing a form of wild card search, suggesting that maybe 'db_accessadmin' is what I want since it…
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Extended Events Session Properties

SQL Server
I like Extended Events and I regularly use the Session Properties window to create and explore sessions. I'm in the window all the time, noting it's quirks & odd behaviors, even as it helps me get stuff done. However, found a new one. Let me tell you about just a few of them. Session Properties Window When you open the Extended Events session properties window for an existing session, in SSMS 18.1, it should look something like this: See the problem? Well, that is the problem. Here, look after I resize it: There it is. At the bottom. By default, the window isn't sized correctly so you see everything. In fact, I'm in the habit of maximizing the window, just because it makes it easier to work with. However, I…
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SQL Server, PostgreSQL and the Future

PostgreSQL, SQL Server
This is just a quick note to talk about the future, mine, yours and this blog. First, I'm not abandoning SQL Server. I'm actively working on a revision of the query performance tuning book (something I should be working on instead of writing this post). SQL Server is my first, and best, database love. We're not going anywhere, SQL Server and I. You can expect more posts on SQL Server, query tuning, execution plans, DevOps, community, #sqlfamily, and everything I've blogged about for the last, ooh, 14 years next month. Second, our family is growing. Just like when a family brings home a new baby, well, I'm adding another database. It doesn't mean I don't love my first database. I still do. We're just going to ALSO be talking about…
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Query Your Statistics: dm_db_stats_properties

SQL Server
We've always been able to look at statistics with DBCC SHOW_STATISTICS. You can even tell SHOW_STATISTICS to only give you the properties, STAT_HEADER, or histogram, HISTOGRAM. However, it's always come back in a format that you can't easily consume in T-SQL. From SQL Server 2012 to everything else, you can simply query sys.dm_db_stats_properties to get that same header information, but in a consumable fashion. dm_db_stats_properties You can pretty easily query the function dm_db_stats_properties: SELECT ddsp.object_id, ddsp.stats_id, ddsp.last_updated, ddsp.rows, ddsp.rows_sampled, ddsp.steps, ddsp.unfiltered_rows, ddsp.modification_counter, ddsp.persisted_sample_percent FROM sys.dm_db_stats_properties(OBJECT_ID('Production.Location'), 1) AS ddsp; You just have to pass in the object_id value and the stats_id value and you're off to the races. I can hear you. Why? So we can do things like this. What if I want to look at statistics that have fewer…
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