PowerShell to Test a Query

So you want to do some tuning, but you’re not sure how to test a query on it’s performance. Not a problem. Here’s a very rough script that I use to do some recent testing. This script to test a query is post #11 of the #enterylevel #iwanttohelp effort started by Tim Ford (b|t). Read about it here. […]

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sp_executesql Is Not Faster Than an Ad Hoc Query

This requires an immediate caveat. You should absolutely be using sp_executesql over any type of non-parameterized execution of T-SQL. You must parameterize your T-SQL because the lack of parameters in building up and executing strings is a classic SQL Injection attack vector. Using straight ad hoc T-SQL is an extremely poor coding choice because o...

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Stored Procedures Are Not Faster Than Views

A performance tuning tip I saw recently said, “Views don’t perform as well as stored procedures.” <sigh> Let’s break this down, just a little. Definitions A view is nothing but a query. The definition given by Microsoft is that it’s a virtual table that’s defined by a query. It’s a query that is used ...

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A Sub-Query Does Not Hurt Performance

The things you read on the internet, for example, “don’t use a sub-query because that hurts performance.” Truly? Where do people get these things? Let’s Test It I’ve written before about the concept of cargo cult data professionals. They see one issue, one time, and consequently extrapolate that to all issues, all the ...

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SELECT * Does Not Hurt Performance

I read all the time how SELECT * hurts performance. I even see where people have said that you just have to supply a column list instead of SELECT * to get a performance improvement. Let’s test it, because I think this is bunkum. The Test I have here two queries: SELECT * FROM Warehouse.StockItemTransactions […]

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Correlated Datetime Columns

SQL Server is a deep and complex product. There’s always more to learn. For example, I had never heard of Correlated Datetime Columns. They were evidently introduced as a database option in SQL Server 2005 to help support data warehousing style queries (frequently using dates and times as join criteria or filter criteria). You can […]

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Query Store, Force Plan and “Better” Plans

I am endlessly fascinated by how the Query Store works. I love teaching it at every opportunity too. Plus, almost every time I teach it, I get a new question about the behavior that makes me delve into the Query Store just a little bit more, enabling me to better understand how it works. I […]

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Query Store, Force Plan and Dropped Objects

I love the Query Store. Seriously. It’s a huge leap forward in the capabilities of Azure SQL Database and SQL Server in support of performance monitoring and query optimization. One of my favorite aspects of the Query Store is the ability to force plans. Frankly though, it’s also the scariest part of the Query Store. […]

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Monitor Query Performance

Blog post #7 in support of Tim Ford’s (b|t) #iwanttohelp, #entrylevel. Read about it here. Sooner or later when you’re working with SQL Server, someone is going to complain that the server is slow. I already pointed out the first place you should look when this comes up. But what if they’re more precise? What […]

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Common Table Expression, Just a Name

The Common Table Expression (CTE) is a great tool in T-SQL. The CTE provides a mechanism to define a query that can be easily reused over and over within another query. The CTE also provides a mechanism for recursion which, though a little dangerous and overused, is extremely handy for certain types of queries. However, the […]

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