Query Store and Automated Cleanup

SQL Server 2016, SQL Server 2017
Query Store has mechanisms for automatically cleaning your data. It is possible to cause them to break down. While presenting a session about the Query Store recently, I was asked what happened if you set the size of the Query Store below the amount of data currently in the store. I didn't know the answer, so we tried it. Things got a little weird. Bryan Hundley of Marathon Consulting asked the question, so Bryan, this blog post is for you. Automated Cleanup There are actually two kinds of automated cleanup inside the Query Store. First, you have a time-based cleanup. By default it keeps queries that have been accessed within the last 30 days. Anything older, it tosses. If you have the stale_query_threshold_days (all in sys.database_query_store_options) set to 0, it…
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Execution Plans and the GDPR

SQL Server 2005, SQL Server 2008, SQL Server 2012, SQL Server 2014, SQL Server 2016, SQL Server 2017
What? Execution plans and the GDPR? Is this it? Have I completely lost it? Well, no, not on this topic, keep reading so I can defend myself. GDPR and Protected Data The core of the GDPR is to ensure the privacy and protection of a "natural person's" information. As such, the GDPR defines what personal data is and what processing means (along with a bunch of additional information). It all comes down to personally identifying (PI) data, how you store it, and how you process it. More importantly, it's about the right for the individual, the natural person, to control their information, up to and including the right to be forgotten by your system. OK. Fine. And execution plans? Execution Plans and PI Data If you look at an execution…
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Query Store Wait Statistics with sys.query_store_wait_stats

Azure, SQL Server 2017
The second best thing to questions that people ask is when I sit down to write a book. It's so easy to miss things in the day-to-day grind of doing work. Then, late at night, you're working on a chapter, so you read up on the documentation to ensure that you're not missing anything. Of course, then you find, yes, you are missing something. In my case, sys.query_store_wait_stats. sys.query_store_wait_stats. If you follow the link above, it'll give you what you need to know, but, I figured I'd provide a little more clarity because I think there are some pitfalls in using this data. I love Query Store (do a search to see all the exploration I've done with it). One of my favorite things is the time intervals. It breaks…
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Query Hash Values, Plan Guides and the Query Store

SQL Server 2016
I was eating dinner with Hugo Kornelis and we started talking about query hash values. You know, like everyone does at dinner. As we talked about it, I suddenly thought about both Plan Guides and the Query Store. I wondered what happened to the query hash values in that case? Thus are blog posts born. Query Hash and Plan Guides The behavior of the query hash itself is fairly straight forward. The text of the query is run through a hashing algorithm within SQL Server and a value comes out, so these two queries: [crayon-5adcd545ed115339427339/] Result in two different query hash values: Unhinted Query Hash 0x7264738ED060F3C1 Hinted Query Hash 0xD763CBB6B860AFF3 Things get interesting if we create a Plan Guide for the first query to make it behave like the second…
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Does Query Store Pre-Allocate Space

SQL Server 2016, TSQL
I love the questions I get while I'm presenting because they force me to think and learn. The question in the title is one I received recently. The answer, now that I'm not standing in front of people, is easy. Of course the space is not pre-allocated. Query Store tables are just system tables. They have a limit on how big they can grow (100mb by default), but that space isn't going to be pre-allocated in any way. The space will just get used as and when it's needed, just like any other system table. However, don't take my word for it, let's prove that. The Test Testing whether or not enabling Query Store is straight forward. Here's a query that should give us information rather quickly: [crayon-5adcd545ed602903955473/] The results come back…
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Database Clone

SQL Server 2014, SQL Server 2016, TSQL
There are a bunch of ways you could create a database clone. Backup and restore is one method. Export/Import is another. There are even third party tools that will help with that. However, each of these has a problem. It's moving all the data, not just once, but twice. You move the data when you export it and you move it again when import it (same thing with backup and restore). That makes these methods slow for larger databases. How can you create a database clone without moving the data multiple times? Don't Move the Data At All New with SQL Server 2016, expanded in SP1, and added to SQL Server 2014 SP2 is a new command, DBCC CLONEDATABASE. This is like a dream come true. The use is extremely…
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Query Data Store Data

SQL Server 2016, TSQL
The data in the Query Data Store is what makes all the magic happen. From collecting the aggregate performance metrics of a query to the various plans in use by that query to being able to force a plan, it's all controlled by the data within the Query Data Store system tables. The Question When I was presenting on this topic at the PASS Summit a few weeks ago, one great question came up (great question = answer is "I don't know"), well, I defaulted to an "I don't know" answer, but my guess was, "No." The question was: can you take a plan from one server, let's say a test server, export it in some way, and then import it to production? In this manner, you ensure that a…
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Query Store and What Happened Earlier On Your Server

SQL Server 2016, TSQL
Here's a great question I received: We had a problem at 9:02 AM this morning, but we're not sure what happened. Can Query Store tell us? My first blush response is, no. Not really. Query Store keeps aggregate performance metrics about the queries on the database where Query Store is enabled. Aggregation means that we can't tell you what happened with an individual call at 9:02 AM... Well, not entirely true. The aggregations that Query Store keeps are actually broken up into intervals that you can control. The default interval is 60 minutes. This means that the information stored in the DMV covers sets of intervals. This means that if, at 9:02AM, you had a query, or queries, that ran considerably longer than normal, you may be able to take a look…
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Query Store and Plan Forcing: What Do You Use It For

SQL Server 2016, TSQL
If you're working with Azure SQL Database or you've moved into SQL Server 2016, one of the biggest new tools is the Query Store. It provides a mechanism of capturing query performance over time and persisting it with the database. You also get the execution plans for those queries. Finally, you can choose to have the Query Store override execution plan selection by use of Plan Forcing. I've written about Query Store a few times: Query Store, Force Plan and "Better" Plans Query Store, Force Plan and Dropped Objects Precedence Goes to Query Store or Plan Guide Query Store, Forced Plans and New Plans Query Store and Optimize For Ad Hoc Query Store and Recompile Finding Your Query in Query Store Removing All Query Store Data Monitor Query Performance OK,…
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Query Store, Force Plan and “Better” Plans

SQL Server 2016, TSQL
I am endlessly fascinated by how the Query Store works. I love teaching it at every opportunity too. Plus, almost every time I teach it, I get a new question about the behavior that makes me delve into the Query Store just a little bit more, enabling me to better understand how it works. I received just such a question at SQLSaturday Norway: If you are forcing a plan, and the physical structure changes such that a "better" plan is possible, what happens with plan forcing? Let's answer a different question first. What happens when the plan gets invalidated, when the index being used gets dropped or some other structural change occurs so that the plan is no longer valid? I answered that question in this blog post. The plan…
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