SQL Server 2008 Install, cont.

SQL Server 2008, Tools
OK. Hopefully you're all reading this stuff BEFORE trying to do the install and certainly BEFORE uninstalling everything in sight. The latest version of SQL Prompt, version 3.9, is 2008 compatible AND doesn't cause this problem with the install. So, I've got to reinstall the software. Time to track down my license. I hope I kept that email.
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SQL Server 2008 Install, cont.

SQL Server 2008, Tools
OK. I found some information. The first suggests uninstalling SQL Prompt. I tried it and that did the trick. The second suggest was to do a brute-force removal of the registry key: HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Microsoft SQL Server\90. I didn't get there.  Install is running on the desktop now. That seems a bit mean of Microsoft, requiring me to uninstall Red Gate's SQL Prompt, especially since it's such a great little tool. I wonder if I can install it on top of 2008? Time for some more research.
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SQL Server 2008 Install

SQL Server 2008
I just finished the install of SQL Server 2008 RTM on my laptop. No real issues except that it wanted SP1 of Visual Studio installed before it would complete. Once I had that done, everything was up and running. The new install routines are nicer than the old ones if a bit more detailed. My desktop is another matter. SQL Server 2008 objected to a SQL Server 2005 Express install. I removed that. It still thinks Express is installed. I'm removing all of SQL Server 2005 to see what happens.  The error reported was pretty non-helpful. This is a bit odd since the laptop also has a copy of Express installed. Well, uninstalling all things SQL Server didn't work. Sql2005SsmsExpressFacet is failing. It simply states: "The SQL Server 2005 Express…
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More on Table Valued Functions

TSQL
From the hits in the search results, this is a popular topic. That being so, I'd like to redirect you to another blog that has some more detailed tests available. These tests show more of the shortcomings of multi-statement table valued functions. Gail Shaw is an MVP and a regular at SQL Server Central. She's worth tracking and this post shows why. I want to be clear. I'm not suggesting that you never, ever, use multi-statement table valued functions. There may be places where their use is helpful. I'm saying that using them comes with a very heavy cost, so you better be sure that they are in fact needed in the situation, whatever it is. There was a long discussion and debate over at SQL Server Central recently on…
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View vs. Table Valued Function vs. Multi-Statement Table Valued Function

TSQL
About five years ago, I was checking an app before it went to production. I hadn't seen the app before then and a junior dba had worked with the developers designing and building the app. It didn't use a single stored procedure or view. Instead, it was built entirely of multi-statement UDF's. These UDF's called other UDF's which joined to UDF's... It was actually a very beautiful design in terms of using the functions more or less like objects within the database. Amazing. It also would not, and could not, perform enough to function, let alone scale. It was a horror because they thought they were done and ready to go to production, but no one had ever tested more than a couple of rows of data in any of…
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SQLPLAN Glitch

SQL Server 2005, TSQL
While I was doing some work for Andy Warren (more on this after Sept 1st), I came across an interesting little glitch when saving XML execution plans out as SQLPlan files. It's easy enough to replicate. Just get an XML execution plan from your query: SET STATISTITCS XML ON; SELECT... Click on the link to open the XML plan. Click on the "File" menu and then the "Save As" menu item. It opens the familiar file save window. Click on the "Save as type" drop down and switch to "All Files (*.*)" Save the file with an extension of ".sqlplan." Good. Now you've got an execution plan file that can be opened and viewed as a GUI execution plan. Without closing the XML, try to open this new plan. You…
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Deadlocks vs. Blocks

SQL Server 2005, SQL Server 2008, TSQL
It makes me crazy when I interview someone who has five or more years as a DBA, but they don't know the difference between a block and a deadlock. It's a complete showstopper for me. If you don't know this, you're an entry-level DBA, don't talk to me about your years of experience. Sorry, but there it is. Here's someone that's kinder than I am in every way. Not only have they cut people slack on this question, but he's provided a well done answer to the question. For those who may interview with me in the future, go and read this and understand it.
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A Horseless Carriage?

Misc
I've talked before about my concern that I'm manufacturing buggy whips.  Jason Massie over at StatisticsIO has posted a pretty convincing argument that cloud computing could be a horseless carriage coming down the road. Effectively we're still looking Diesel's first engine, but that could mean it's just a matter of time. As Mr. Massie points out, the speed of change in IT is one heck of a lot faster than in other parts of the world. So, when you do finally see that Stanley Steamer roar by, belching smoke and going half the speed of a good horse, don't laugh and point. Someone is spending time & money on that thing and they're not buying your buggy whip. Clouds are just like any other major technological shift (ORM anyone?) that could…
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SQL Server DBA’s Sound-Off

SQL Server 2005, SQL Server 2008
This is a great read about the attitudes and beliefs of quite a few SQL Server DBA's. It's very interesting how certain beliefs and attitudes seem to be common. I was also reassured that my attitude about a certain DBA was accurate... less said the better. These are interesting and informative guys doing the same kind of work that I try to do. If you're trying to, go read it and learn. I read about it on StatisticsIO. Another place with good things to read.
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Virtual Drives

SQL Server 2005, SQL Server 2008
I published an article describing an attempt my company made at using virtual servers as a full-fledged development environment. It didn't work real well. I'm not a systems guy. I know a bit. I pay attention and learn things. I certainly listen to the people around me that are systems experts. When several of them commented on this great assessment of virtual drives, I went and read it. It sounds like some really cool technology only with the ability to really make our lives harder. Like the article says, how often do you check to see if the drive has slowed down?
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