Search Results for: extended event

Trace Flags in Azure SQL Database

One of the ways that you take more direct control over your SQL Server instances is through the use of trace flags. There are a number that people recommend you enable by default. Prior to Extended Events for example, I'd say you should turn on trace flag 1222 in order to capture deadlock information on your server (now I just recommend you use the system_health session). I absolutely think you should turn on trace flag 2371 to get better behavior out of your automated statistics updates. There are others that I'll leave to all the systems experts to advise you on. What about Azure SQL Database? I doubt you'll be shocked, but if I try this: DBCC TRACEON (2371,-1); I get the following error: Msg 2571, Level 14, State 3,…
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Monitoring for Timeouts

The question came up at SQL Rally, "Can you use Extended Events to monitor for query timeouts?" My immediate response was yes... and then I stood there trying to think of exactly how I'd do it. Nothing came quickly to mind. So, I promised to track down the answer and post it to the blog. My first thought is to use the Causality Tracking feature to find all the places where you have a sql_batch_starting without a sql_batch_completed (or the same thing with rpc calls). And you know what, that would work. But, before I got too deep in trying to write the query that would find all the mismatched attach_activity_id values that have a sequence of 1, but not one of 2, I did some additional reading. Seems there's…
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Speaker of the Month: January 2015

I love it that my first post of the new year is going to be Speaker of the Month. I'm really enjoying doing these because I'm getting to attend a lot more sessions at the events I go to in order to get choices. But, please, don't bug me. If I can attend your session, I will. If I can't... Anyway. Speaker of the Month for January 2015 is William Wolf (b|t) and his session "Common Coding Mistakes and How to Mitigate Them" that was delivered at SQL Saturday DC. This was a good session. It was informative. I really liked how Bill (I'm going to use that because it's easier to type and despite looking like the Demon Biker of the Apocalypse, he's a bigger sweetheart than I am) kept…
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“Pretty Plans vs. Performance” or “Grant Gets Pwned”

If you get an execution plan that looks like this: I wouldn't blame you for immediately thinking about query tuning. Especially if the code that generated it looks like this: SELECT soh.OrderDate, sod.OrderQty, sod.LineTotal FROM Sales.SalesOrderHeader AS soh INNER JOIN Sales.SalesOrderDetail AS sod ON sod.SalesOrderID = soh.SalesOrderID WHERE soh.SalesOrderID IN (@p1, @p2, @p3, @p4, @p5, @p6, @p7, @p8, @p9, @p10, @p11, @p12, @p13, @p14, @p15, @p16, @p17, @p18, @p19, @p20, @p21, @p22, @p23, @p24, @p25, @p26, @p27, @p28, @p29, @p30, @p31, @p32, @p33, @p34, @p35, @p36, @p37, @p38, @p39, @p40, @p41, @p42, @p43, @p44, @p45, @p46, @p47, @p48, @p49, @p50, @p51, @p52, @p53, @p54, @p55, @p56, @p57, @p58, @p59, @p60, @p61, @p62, @p63, @p64, @p65, @p66, @p67, @p68, @p69, @p70, @p71, @p72, @p73, @p74, @p75, @p76, @p77, @p78, @p79, @p80,…
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Query Performance Tuning in SQL Server

I have a pre-con coming up at the PASS Summit. You can read about it here. I named it "Query Performance Tuning in SQL Server 2014" because it seemed like a good idea to bring out the aspects of 2014, and we will. But, I need to tell you, this is primarily a session about query performance tuning in SQL Server, full stop. I'm going to cover information that's applicable all the way back to SQL Server 2000 and 2005. The majority of the information will be applicable to 2008 and up. I'm going to go over the things you can do with dynamic management views to pull information about queries to tune right out of the cache. That's applicable to more than 2014. We're also going to go over…
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A Full Day of Query Tuning

I'm excited to able to say that I've been given the opportunity to put on a full day workshop at SQL Connections on Friday, September 19th, 2014. The title is "Query Performance Tuning in SQL Server 2014", but I assure you we're going to cover things that are applicable if you're still working on SQL Server 2005. We'll start the day covering the different mechanisms you have to capture query metrics. We'll go over dynamic management objects and extended events that are incredibly important to you in understanding which queries you need to tune. We'll get an introduction into how the optimizer works and the importance that statistics, indexes and constraints play in helping the optimizer make the choices it makes. I promise, execution plans will be covered throughout the…
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Natively Compiled Procedures and Execution Plans

The combination of in-memory tables and natively compiled procedures in SQL Server 2014 makes for some seriously screaming fast performance. Add in all the cool functionality around optimistic locking, hash indexes and all the rest, and we're talking about a fundamental shift in behavior. But... Ah, you knew that was coming. But, you can still write bad T-SQL or your statistics can get out of date or you can choose the wrong index, or any of the other standard problems that come up that can negatively impact all those lovely performance enhancements. Then what? Well, same as before, take a look at the execution plan to understand how the optimizer has resolved your queries. But... Yeah, another one. But, things are a little different with the natively compiled procedures and…
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Windows Azure Views

It's kind of fun to see Azure development artifacts on display. I've posted about them before, a couple of times. I'm starting to finally get systematized about the whole thing, just so I can see stuff as it changes rather than discover them by accident or get told about them by someone else. Here's a little query I'm running to see when system views were last modified: SELECT av.name, av.create_date, av.modify_date FROM sys.all_views AS av ORDER BY av.modify_date DESC; The most recent stack of changes are here: I'll keep an eye on them to see what I can spot about interesting new functionality. I also compared the listing of all views in Azure to those on a SQL Server 2012 instance and came up with a list of differences. These…
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Learn Query Tuning in Dallas

I am excited to be able to tell you about an all day seminar that I'll be putting on prior to the Dallas SQL Saturday #255. The seminar will be on November 1, 2013. It's called Query Performance Tuning in SQL Server. We're going to cover the topic from an understanding of the optimizer to collecting data using extended events to reading execution plans and then on to lots of standard problems and their solutions. If you sign up before September 21st you can get a substantial early-bird discount, so I'd jump on it. Also, seats are limited, so don't wait too long. Let's get together and talk query tuning.
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Does Encryption Affect Seeing Statements in Deadlock Graphs?

Good question. I don’t have a clue. So let’s set up a test. I’ll create this stored procedure: CREATE PROCEDURE DL2e WITH ENCRYPTION AS BEGIN TRANSACTION UPDATE Purchasing.PurchaseOrderDetail SET OrderQty = 2 WHERE ProductID = 448 AND PurchaseOrderID = 1255; Then I’ll execute things in the following order. From one connection this query: UPDATE Purchasing.PurchaseOrderHeader SET Freight = Freight * 0.9 --9% discount on shipping WHERE PurchaseOrderID = 1255; From a second connection, my stored procedure: EXEC dbo.dl2e; Then, back on the first connection, this query: UPDATE Purchasing.PurchaseOrderDetail SET OrderQty = 4 WHERE ProductID = 448 AND PurchaseOrderID = 1255; That will generate a deadlock. It’s a straight-forward classic deadlock. I’m using extended events to capture the deadlock graph and the output looks like this: <deadlock> <victim-list> <victimProcess id="process472310928" />…
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